April 2018


Dear community of Sultanas, Namaste!


Currently, over 5 million female baby boomers turn 55 every day, redefining our Third Act to serve, engage and participate in a better future for ourselves, children and grandchildren. Imagine the power of love-based activists as pioneers of purpose. We can cross boundaries of fear and operate with the energy of expansion and love.


Erik Erikson, a German-American developmental psychologist, articulated 8 stages of psychological development of human beings. In the Third Act, he identified “generativity” as a concern for the future, a need to nurture and guide younger people and contribute to the next generation.

As love-based activists, we give forward to pay back.


With a leap of faith and a dollop of humor, we show up for whatever is in front of us. In the dance of Sultanas, we practice moving forward, back, side to side. We embody the rhythm of the 4 directions: Flexibility, agility, stability and creativity.

In the words of Venerable Dhyani Ywahoo, our keynote speaker for Sultanas Gathering:

“We can transform patterns of behavior and view that no longer serve us. We make a commitment to energize clarity and compassion in our communication and activities and that we are confirming our spiritual commitment to speaking with kindness and weaving with our thought, word and action, a tapestry of harmonious relationship.”


See y’all in Burlington, VT Sept. 7-8 for Sultanas Gathering. Registration is now open, and you can do so by clicking here.

YALLA! [ let’s go in Hebrew and Arabic]




Hinda Miller, Founder

The Sultanas Group




What's New:

Sultana's Gathering Fall

September 7- 8, Burlington, VT

This year has been an auspicious time to lean into our 'Sultanahood', from booming to blooming each in our own lives, in our own time, in our own way. It is no accident that we are all drawn together, asking the question: “How do we want to live and die in our Sultana years?”


Click Here for more information and to register.



Interview

Venerable Dhyani Ywahoo


Venerable Dhyani Ywahoo is the 27th generation holder of the Ywahoo lineage (Tsalagi/Cherokee tradition) and a respected Buddhist teacher. Read More.

What is your idea of perfect happiness? My idea of perfect happiness is: all family, friends, neighbors and co-workers in joyful harmony, creating positive and illuminating activities and methods that reveal to many that joy and happiness arise within and are expressed wherever we look and go.

What is your current state of mind? My current state of mind is aware that we as a nation and planetary family are within an arising paradigm which reflects mutual respect and motivation.

Although some speak of the gig economy as serfdom, in that workers are without benefits and equitable compensation, I have confidence in people directly selling services to one another almost instantly with equitable compensation.

Just as the 3D printer changed manufacturing, I have a sense that the arising block chain technology gives an opportunity to those who have skill sets and knowledge, to directly benefit themselves and others.

An example would be someone who has created honey co-ops and has a simple method on how to measure and notice cost efficiency. Someone who has a system for a highly productive honey distribution can share that technology with anyone else in the world.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Silence is overrated because many people are harmed by it. This ideal virtue has been a pathway to harm. We grow up hearing that silence is golden, a treasure and this idea of virtue has caused harm to children and women and innocents and others whose voice was not heard. So while silence is wonderful for contemplation, the withholding of information is harmful or the refusal to hear the voices of those who cry for equality or simply respect is unconscionable.

And such unconscionable behavior is systematized by systems which perceive dominion over. The

adage of “sparing the rod and spoiling the child” has been an excuse to cause harm to those weaker and unable to protect themselves. The idea that a man can do no wrong in the male/female dynamic paved the way for sexual power games which are now very much in the news. People have had enough of abuse of power and the secrets that are demanded to perpetuate the behavior of dominion over another’s life.

So these times are revealing the importance of penetrating insight, a light that looks behind the curtain and illuminates the error and generates right action.

Which talent would you most like to have? I’d like to sing in perfect harmony.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? I’d be as tall as I think I am.

What do you consider your greatest achievement? Being a working mom and having been a working mom and throughout the process of benefiting my children, I was able to also benefit many others and create systems of co-operation.

Also creating Sunray Meditation Society, which was my grandparents’ vision of co-operation and a voice arising to honor original instructions within each Indigenous community.

This led to a period of information sharing which included reports to the human rights commission in Geneva as a delegate of the American Indian Treaty Council. Upon seeing politics as dichotomous, I chose to return to original spiritual instructions as a reminder that we are indeed one human family, and that there is no “them” or “us;” that we are each impacted by the pollution blowing in the wind and floating in the sea and the lies of limitation.

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be? A rainbow torus ring.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? To see people starving and to not have immediate means of transforming their suffering.

​© 2018 by The Sultana Group LLC